WAYNEPARK.COM

Discipling the Future of the New City

Holy Week Good Friday: Stepping Out Of The Cave

platosCave01

GOOD FRIDAY, April 18

Mark 10:50 Throwing aside his cloak, he jumped up and came to Jesus. 51 And answering him, Jesus said, “What do you want Me to do for you?” And the blind man said to Him, “Rabboni, I want to regain my sight!” 52 And Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and began following Him on the road.

There were three prisoners in a cave. Facing the wall, they knew nothing of the outside world, only the dancing shadows on the wall cast by the light of the fire behind them. This was their reality. Until a liberator came, to free them from their chains, to turn and face the reality outside the cave. The first prisoner refused, “Are you mad? This is reality right here!” And he never averted his gaze from the wall. The second prisoner stirred as he heard the voice of the liberator. But he just could not tear his gaze away from the transfixing images on the wall. The third prisoner looked away just long enough for the liberator to capture his attention: “There is another world out there, far more real than this – ” to which the noble prisoner responded “then take me there, I want to see.”

Blind Bartimaeus’ request in verse 51: “Rabboni, I want to regain my sight” is eerily contrastive amidst so much pervasive and self-deluding blindness in these recent passages in Mark. James and John don’t get it. Neither do the disciples in their failed attempts at exorcism. Even Peter seems to miss the mark, with an answer so close yet so far. Bartimaeus seems to be the only one to admit he cannot see in the first place.

Poor, blind, and noble Bartimaeus. Who wants to regain sight. He is the first to tear his gaze from the wall. The first to step out of the cave. Even “throws aside” his possessions for it (his cloak… contrast this with the rich young ruler prior). “I want to regain my sight.” How often are we willing to make such an admission? We are too often, too snugly know-it-alls. God grant us the grace to see we need to regain something. Grace. Love. Understanding. Faith. Sight. Humility.

Last thought.

Jesus says it again. “What do you want Me to do for you?” That’s not a coincidence. I think the wording is deliberately chosen there, echoing vs. 36 previously. And all this time He has been talking about how “the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve” (vs. 45).

Two postures to take with us into Good Friday, as we keep our vigil by the side of the cross: 1: a desire to see / regain sight, and 2: a servant posture asking, “What do you want me to do for you?”

- PW


This Holy Week, we at Harvest will be bringing to you daily reflections from Pastor Wayne’s study through Mark to aid you in your own personal reflection and prayers throughout this last week of Lent. If you are in the Houston area, join us for EASTER SUNDAY at Harvest at 9:30am!

 

Holy Week Maundy Thursday: Seeing With Eyes To See

blindSeeing

MAUNDY THURSDAY, April 17

Mark 10:46 Then they came to Jericho. And as He was leaving Jericho with His disciples and a large crowd, a blind beggar named Bartimaeus, the son of Timaeus, was sitting by the road. 47 When he heard that it was Jesus the Nazarene, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” 48 Many were sternly telling him to be quiet, but he kept crying out all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” 49 And Jesus stopped and said, “Call him here.” So they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take courage, stand up! He is calling for you.”

Many years ago a boy born with congenital blindness was offered a then-state of the art corneal transplant. After the lengthy recovery and the bandages were removed, the momentous occasion signaled the obvious pressing question: “What do you see?” To which an equally unremarkable response: “I don’t know.” The boy perceived a varying brightness in front of him. Requesting to touch that moving thing, and upon making eye-hand contact with the physician’s waving hand, he excitedly exclaimed, “It’s moving!” Doctors and philosophers alike learned at that moment that “turning on the lights” does not necessitate sight, but the ability to see had still to be learned; light and eyes were not enough, and in that regard to give back sight to a congenitally blind person was just as much the work of an educator as it was of a surgeon.

Jesus was very much concerned in this passage (and in the preceding) with spiritual sight, as much as He was concerned with physical sight. This story of the blind man in many ways frames the larger theme of spiritual sight and (in)ability to see “with eyes to see and ears to hear.” And along the way, surprisingly, it is so often the blind who are given access to true Sight while those who think they see the most are truly blind.

Don’t be deluded; is your “sight” Sight?

For true seeing is so often precipitated by the admission that we don’t yet see, or understand yet. In that sense, Easter is for the doubting, for the faltering. It is in this posture, this admission that “I do not yet see” that we can be granted sight as a gift; I have been reading the classic by C.S. Lewis, Surprised By Joy. What an apt title. In his pursuit of Joy, it eluded, and only in the admission of its loss did it come as surprise.

These remaining Holy Days stay your vigil. Your number WILL be called. It will surprise you when it comes. And you will be blessed. So “Take courage, stand up! He is calling for you.”
- PW


This Holy Week, we at Harvest will be bringing to you daily reflections from Pastor Wayne’s study through Mark to aid you in your own personal reflection and prayers throughout this last week of Lent. If you are in the Houston area, join us for EASTER SUNDAY at Harvest at 9:30am!

Holy Week Wednesday: The Upside-Down Community

Keith Haring, Ten Commandments

WEDNESDAY, April 16

41 Hearing this, the ten began to feel indignant with James and John. 42 Calling them to Himself, Jesus said to them, “You know that those who are recognized as rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them; and their great men exercise authority over them. 43 But it is not this way among you, but whoever wishes to become great among you shall be your servant; 44 and whoever wishes to be first among you shall be slave of all. 45 For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.”

Years ago in the 1960′s, Illinois was issuing automobile license plates, starting with the number “1″. Paul Powell, then Illinois secretary of state, had to decide who would get the much-coveted number. Much to the indignation of thousands, he decided to solve the problem by assigning it to himself. His reason? “I’m not about to assign it to someone and make about a thousand other people feel hurt.” So he conveniently assigned it to himself.

The opportunism and the resentfulness directed at it is not lost on us in today’s passage. By seeking to be “first in line” the Zebedee brothers took self-help profiteering to ugly new heights. And we all feel indignant about it. Because we wish we had done it first. They were only smarter and faster. Next time we will be.

And thus begins the vicious cycle of envy, jealousy, ambition, competitiveness, and finally unbridled will to power.

See how devilish we become.

C.S. Lewis, in remarking on his own beginning transformation into the Christian faith recognized the stark, unbudging evil within: “For the first time I examined myself with a seriously practical purpose. And there I found what appalled me; a zoo of lusts, a bedlam of ambitions, a nursery of fears, a harem of fondled hatreds. My name was legion.”

Of all the unchallenged evils within us, will to power seems to be the most tolerated, almost acceptable in society. After all we live by the maxims, “the early bird gets the worm”, “God helps those who help themselves.”

I warn against such unbridled self-preservation.

The Gospel of the Upside-Down Community challenges this notion of unabashed self-advancement, and replaces it with the counter-cultural notion of placing others first; not subjugating but serving, not wielding power but giving it up.

This Holy Week we are reminded that “even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.” May you find deep dignity and gratification as you re-direct your self-will towards others instead and live a life of service and unselfishness.

- PW


This Holy Week, we at Harvest will be bringing to you daily reflections from Pastor Wayne’s study through Mark to aid you in your own personal reflection and prayers throughout this last week of Lent. If you are in the Houston area, join us for EASTER SUNDAY at Harvest at 9:30am!

Holy Week Tuesday: “What Do You Want Me To Do For You?”

Jesus washes his disciples' feet - John 13:1-17

TUESDAY, April 15th

35 James and John, the two sons of Zebedee, came up to Jesus, saying, “Teacher, we want You to do for us whatever we ask of You.” 36 And He said to them, “What do you want Me to do for you?” 37 They said to Him, “Grant that we may sit, one on Your right and one on Your left, in Your glory.” 38 But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or to be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?” 39 They said to Him, “We are able.” And Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you shall drink; and you shall be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized. 40 But to sit on My right or on My left, this is not Mine to give; but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

When I was about five or six, I was visiting Coney Island with my dad. We stood before The Cyclone, a legendary, rickety roller coaster that seemed as benign to me as the rollercoasters I saw people riding on TV. Until I actually got in the seat and began the horrifying ascent towards the sky, feeling every rail tick and crick by, I realized how deluded I really was about the actual experience; I endured ten minutes of sheer and constant torture that culminated with me back on the ground, vomiting up all of my previously-eaten ice cream. Of course before all this began, before I hopped in the saddle, my dad would ask me with a bemused, knowing look on his face… “Are you able to do this?” “Positive” I said. “I am able.”

Fresh off the heels of Jesus’ grim pronouncement, the Zebedee brothers are looking out for number one: themselves. It is opportunism, profiteering, and self-seeking at its worst. Add to the mix that they really “did not know what they were asking.” Jesus seems to patiently go along with their little pipe dream of glory, without bursting their bubble: “Are you able to do this?” When they say succinctly, “We are able”, I get the sense they still don’t know what they’ve really signed up for. The roller coaster life of discipleship – the actual experience of it – would be no joyride, and it would indeed culminate with their “drinking the same cup” and “being baptized with the same baptism” of Christ.

Knowing in retrospect what He’s talking about, would you still get on the ride?

There is another thing about this passage too important not to mention at least briefly, in closing. Keep it in mind because it will come up again later. Jesus asks, “What do you want me to do for you?” This deliberately worded phrase is repeated again later on. Amidst all the talk of glory and titles, Jesus is waiting tables. He is service-minded. He will mention later on about how the true path to glory is not in “subjugating” or “wielding power over others” (literal translations) but coming in and among as waiters, attendants, servants, slaves. One of my professors at Regent, J.I. Packer describes being a servant as “devoting time, trouble, and substance.”

If I can summarize what servanthood means for me today:

It is stepping outside of myself to do for others what has no benefit for me; simply giving for the joy of giving. The result is something no self-seeking can attain – deep and abiding Joy, selfless Joy.

May we find another Way, another Path to glory this week that is not through accolades, ambition, and accomplishment, but rather the way of constant downward movement, subverting our own impulses to power, and taking the posture of servants instead.

- PW


This Holy Week, we at Harvest will be bringing to you daily reflections from Pastor Wayne’s study through Mark to aid you in your own personal reflection and prayers throughout this last week of Lent. If you are in the Houston area, join us for EASTER SUNDAY at Harvest at 9:30am!

Holy Week Monday: Facing Our Fears

Kramskoĭ, Ivan Nikolaevich, 1837-1887

MONDAY, April 14th

Mark 10:32 They were on the road going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking on ahead of them; and they were amazed, and those who followed were fearful. And again He took the twelve aside and began to tell them what was going to happen to Him, 33 saying, “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be delivered to the chief priests and the scribes; and they will condemn Him to death and will hand Him over to the Gentiles. 34 They will mock Him and spit on Him, and scourge Him and kill Him, and three days later He will rise again.”

Fourteen years ago I began the Journey of the rest of my life, as I packed all my possessions – crammed, really – into a little 4-door Toyota Corolla stick shift, purchased just for the occasion. I was leaving home. For good. And as I made my way across the country, every day a piece of me died, while another part came alive; I was excited, but sad. Above all, I was resolute. There was no turning back. A new life waited for me at my destination.

Jesus here possesses a similar resoluteness; but it’s far more scarier, because what awaits Him is not an exciting new life, but certain death – AND THEN new life. He is “on the road” – not in the sense that he’s yet on another journey or camping trip, but that He’s on THE Road, resolute, towards Jerusalem, and towards the Cross. No turning back. This Holy Week, think of that. See His resolve. “Not my will but Thine be done.” I sometimes have to pray that prayer repeatedly just to make it through the day. Pray that prayer yourself.

33 Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be delivered… condemned… handed over… mocked… spit on… scourged… and killed. The verbs spit out like a barrage of machine gun fire. In the Greek, these terrible words almost have a rhythmic lyricism about them. In fact, they rhyme! And in such a matter-of-fact way, Mark’s Jesus just drills them out, one by one, like poetry. It’s the only way to prepare for the trauma to come: list it out. Say what’s coming. Let them know. Prepare to be unprepared for the traumatic pain of the cross and rejection.

“Not my will but Thine be done.”

How many times did Jesus say that muttering under His breath along “the road” even as He “walked on ahead of them”. How many times must we say that ourselves, in just living our lives, asking for the courage to do the right thing? Sure it’s not the cross and scourgings and terrible rejection, but we all to some degree must say that over and over again as we continue on the Journey:

“Not my will but Thine be done.”

This Holy Week may we enter into a posture of acceptance and surrender. May God bless you all as we approach both His cross and ours.

- PW


This Holy Week, we at Harvest will be bringing to you daily reflections from Pastor Wayne’s study through Mark to aid you in your own personal reflection and prayers throughout this last week of Lent. If you are in the Houston area, join us for EASTER SUNDAY at Harvest at 9:30am!

When Prayer Is Like Pounding On A Silent Door

I’ve been preaching a series through Mark this season at my church. Truthfully it’s been a difficult process – not in the work behind crafting and preparing for it, which I enjoy – but in the eery way the Journey of the disciples has been too similar to that of my church to be coincidental. It’s almost prophetic. I’m talking about the ups and downs of it all, the flagging understanding, the desertions which dishearten, the opposition of opponents voiced amidst stalwart supporters (“where else shall we go?”). The joys and the small victories (“we healed many!” of 6:13) and yet the setbacks of unbelief (“he could do no miracle there”).

It is too much drama for one pastor to behold in a season.

When I stumbled on the above words by Parker Palmer, voiced by Pete Scazzero, about how we persistently try to push through our requests to heaven, I had in back of mind the passage I was working on for Sunday: 9:29 “This kind cannot come out by anything but prayer (and fasting).” Aint that the truth. You can’t push thru something if the door is locked. And sometimes that is an indication that you just have to try a different methodology.

After all you’ve heard the adage; “insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” So maybe persistence is not the key but approaching the same thing differently.

I think that’s what the prayer and fasting is about.

Not so much more pleading, persisting, cajoling; that would be just more pounding upon a silent door. But I am of the view that actually praying while performing their exorcisms was something they did not do to begin with, and it was actually novel for the disciples; that what was required was not so much more persistence but a different approach; and if indeed Jesus is talking about prayer AND fasting, then what He’s talking about is certainly not an instantaneous transaction. To expect it to be so is childish.

It’s a process.

So as I reflect on my church’s Journey through Mark I am increasingly aware of my own need to be more process-oriented (as opposed to outcome-oriented); to be less future-minded and more here-and-now; to not neglect the relationships in front of me in favor of one more newcomer; because the work of creating culture and discipling the future of the new city is one that will take – in the words of Eugene Peterson – “a long obedience in the same direction.”

The Ancient Monster Cycle in Crimea / Ukraine

“But who do you say that I am?”

Peter answered and said to Him, “You are the Christ”

These words have rung in my ears throughout this week as I continue to teach through Mark this season at Harvest. At first blush, I always presumed this to be the correct answer, but upon further study I understand; right answer, wrong Christ.

At the same time I’ve been watching the unrest develop in Ukraine / Crimea. Watching Putin wait for the close of Sochi only to unabashedly jump into the Crimean peninsula. No shame. Just had to get the Olympics out of the way. Now on to the everyday work of occupying neighboring nations. It’s audacious, and it’s immoral.

Didn’t the protesters see this coming???

Hasn’t it happened numerous times in the past already? (Stalin)

I am no proponent for the perpetuation of the status quo, but to set about to change something requires some foresight; did they not see this coming? Did they really expect to set up their own government? Did they not see Putin coming?

What would have been the lesser of two evils; settling for a corrupt status quo under a monster, or fomenting revolution only to pave the way for a greater monster?

It strikes me as naive.

The same way as the above statement by Peter in Mark 8:29 strikes me as unknowing, not understanding what’s really at stake, what’s on the table, what the issues are, what the risks are.

Maybe he wouldn’t have signed up, if he knew what that term “Christ” meant.

Because this Christ would not perpetuate the “monster cycle” of Caesars replacing conquerors replacing kings; Rome replacing Greece replacing Babylon; Iron replacing bronze replacing gold.

Homey don’t play that.

Jesus will not be that Christ.

This is the Christ He will be:

8:34 And He summoned the crowd with His disciples, and said to them, “If anyone wishes to come after Me, he must deny himself, and take up his cross and follow Me. 35 For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake and the gospel’s will save it. 36 For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world, and forfeit his soul? 37 For what will a man give in exchange for his soul? 38 For whoever is ashamed of Me and My words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will also be ashamed of him when He comes in the glory of His Father with the holy angels.” 9 And Jesus was saying to them, “Truly I say to you, there are some of those who are standing here who will not taste death until they see the kingdom of God after it has come with power.”

It is so alt; so not-of-this-world, so un-Machiavellian, so right.

I close with the words of the “Eleventh Step Prayer” which embodies this ethos of Christ and not of the Monster:

Lord, grant that I may seek rather to understand,

than to be understood; to comfort than to be comforted

to love, than to be loved.

For it is by self-forgetting that one finds.

It is by forgiving that one is forgiven.

It is by dying that one awakens to eternal life.

%d bloggers like this: